AOG-WhitePaper

January 18, 2018 | 53 views

The AOG tokens aren’t meant to represent securities in any jurisdiction. This white paper does not represent a prospectus or supply document of any kind and isn’t meant to represent a proposal of securities or a solicitation for investment in securities in any jurisdiction. The information set below might not be exhaustive and isn’t meant to imply any elements of a contractual relationship. While every effort has been made to ensure that any material in this whitepaper is accurate and up to date, however, such material in no way is to be understood as advice. AOG doesn’t guarantee, and refrains from any legal liability whatsoever arising from or connected to, the exactness, dependability, prevalence, or completeness of any material contained in this white paper.

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American Academy of PAs

The American Academy of PAs (AAPA) is the only national professional association that represents all PAs across all medical settings and specialties in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories except for Puerto Rico, the armed forces and the federal services.

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NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

Utilize an Email Marketing Strategy to Drive More Donations

Article | July 29, 2022

When creating your nonprofit fundraising and donations strategy, email marketing should be on the top of the list of channels to use to support your efforts. However, 70% of nonprofits do not have an email marketing strategy, despite 26% of online donors saying email marketing is what inspires them to give. Email marketing can help nonprofits reach their fundraising goals by helping expand reach, develop a loyal donor base and drive more donations. Build an Email Marketing Strategy Implementing email marketing may seem intimidating to some, but once you have an effective strategy in place, it will act as a blueprint and support all your goals moving forward. When you start building your strategy, it’s important to spend time developing a unique strategy that aligns with your mission and goals. Consider these questions: Who is your target audience? How are you collecting email addresses? What types of emails will you send? What types of content do you want to share in those emails? What will your emails look like? What is the layout? What is the design based on? How often do you plan to send emails? What platform will you use? Does it integrate with your donor database and have all the features you need to implement your strategy? Email marketing is the most effective and successful when there's a strategic plan in place. Creating a detailed strategy that answers the questions above will provide your nonprofit with the stepping stones needed to set your email marketing efforts up for success and help meet your overall fundraising goals. Send Emails Once you have a strategy and execution plan in place, you’re ready to start sending your messages to your audience. Email subscribers want to hear from you, but you need to be sure you are sending engaging messages to the right audiences. When you start sending your emails, plan to send a mix of different messages to your audience. Email marketing is an effective channel to not only fundraise but to help subscribers stay engaged and keep donor retention high. A great example would be to include advocacy emails in your plans. Advocacy emails include newsletters and impact stories. These types of emails help your subscriber feel valued as a donor as they’re seeing the direct impact of their support. As you start and continue to send emails, always track each email's performance. This helps you determine what is working and what is not working. By tracking key metrics, like click-through rates, conversation rates and donations per email, you will be able to continuously improve your strategy and the emails you are sending. Follow Best Practices As you begin to execute your email strategy, there are a few key best practices I recommend following to help increase engagement, donations, and overall performance of your emails. Personalize the email for your subscribers. Personalized emails can generate donations up to six times more compared to a generalized email. Make sure your emails are well-designed with compelling imagery that helps the donor visualize your mission and the impact of their donations. Provide clear calls to action in each email you send and always include a “Donate” button in all your communications. Include social sharing buttons and links to your social channels in all your email communications. Emails with social sharing buttons increase click-through rates by as much as 158% and help expand your reach by allowing donors to recommend and share your nonprofit with their network. Create an email cadence so you are regularly communicating with your audience throughout the year. For every 1,000 fundraising emails delivered, nonprofits raised $78, so it is in your best interest to continuously send messages to your subscribers. Start by sending emails monthly and then experiment with increasing the frequency of emails per month and see what works best for your nonprofit. Utilizing email marketing is key to having a successful fundraising strategy for your nonprofit. By building a well-thought-out strategy and implementing it, you will be able to engage, retain and convert subscribers into a loyal donor base.

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NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

The Psychology Behind Donations

Article | July 28, 2022

Are you expecting all donors to be the same? If you answered “no…well actually… kinda,” then you are not alone. It’s simple to send out the same fundraising message to everyone. However, you can transform your fundraising when you understand that there are many reasons why a person chooses to donate to a nonprofit. Once you understand the psychology of donating to charity, you can then best appeal to current and potential donors. Why do Donors Give? Along a spectrum, there are two extremes that prevent nonprofits from using donation psychology in their fundraising messages. On one end, the person making the ask – the Executive Director, Development person or Board member – assumes all donors have the same motivations for giving that they do. This translates into single-focused messaging that appeals to the person making the ask and to some donors, but not to others. On the other end of the spectrum when a nonprofit neglects philanthropy psychology, the person making the ask becomes paralyzed. They fear offending donors by asking at the “wrong” time. They focus on external, societal crises, such as the pandemic, wars, tragedies, and make a decision for the donor that this is the wrong time to be asked for a gift. They assume that the donor would be offended if asked. The Millennial Impact Project studied why donors across generations start giving. Unexpectedly, according to the researcher, Derrick Feldmann, donors first give because they want to belong. They desire to join their friends or be a part of a cause doing the good they wish to see in the world – this is before they understand what the cause or nonprofit is seeking to accomplish. As they gain that sense of belonging and begin believing in the cause, they can be motivated to continue to give when the nonprofit taps into their giving style. The Seven Faces of Philanthropy was groundbreaking research published in 1994 that has been updated and is still relevant today. In summary, the researchers found that donors give for different reasons. Some donors give because they enjoy the act of giving, especially through events. More donors prefer to donate to local charities or make a long-lasting impact through their investments. Other donors desire to repay or pay forward in gratitude through their giving. Others give because of religious or altruistic reasons. Then, there are donors who see giving as a family tradition and, if applicable, to teach their children generosity. Understanding the donor’s motivations for giving guides a nonprofit in developing the right message, using the right fundraising methods and segmenting to the right group of donors. How Can you Encourage Your Donors to Give? Now that you understand the psychology behind making a philanthropic gift, you can implement this knowledge to customize your fundraising appeals. First, you will need to determine why your donors give. This is done through discussions with Board members, personal conversations with donors, and through donor surveys. It begins with a simple question, “Why do you give to…?” The answers will assist you in creating donor identities; that is, the types of identities or groups where donors wish to belong. Sample identities could be “community leader” or “survivor” or “change maker.” Next, based on what you learned from your current donors, pick the top two or three donor motivations and associated identities. Alter your current messaging and fundraising methods to these giving reasons. The messaging and methods that inspire your current donors will likely attract more donors. Begin testing your messaging for these two to three reasons: Which message has the highest engagement in response and donation? This will be your primary message that you will rotate with the secondary messages. As you further explore your donor’s psychology for giving, you can advance to segmenting your communications based on what will motivate groups of donors to give. Once you understand donor psychology, you will wonder how you missed the clues to why your donors give – and be ready to catch future donors by staying one step ahead of their giving habits.

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NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

How Donor Data Can Inform Better Donor Experiences

Article | July 14, 2022

Although we recommend talking directly with your donors to learn what matters to them, one-on-one conversations aren’t the only way to gain valuable information about your donors. Through analysis of the donor data in your fundraising software, you can obtain insights that will help you create a better experience for your donors, and motivate them to give more over time. Here’s what you can learn from the numbers and how you can apply this knowledge to improve your donor experience. Biographic and Demographic Information: This particular donor data isn’t snazzy, but it provides you with important tools to use in donor communications. Here’s what you can do with it. Preferred Name: Even something as simple as addressing your donors by their preferred names or nicknames will go a long way toward building a meaningful relationship. Employment: Improve the timing of your emails by sending to full-time individuals when they’re at work. Age: Millennials are more likely to check social media or text messages for communications, while Baby Boomers are more likely to use email or even snail mail. A multi-channel communication strategy, however, is the best thing to help you reach your donors where they’re at. Educational Background: While someone’s education level may provide insights about their capacity to give, consider looking at what your contacts were involved in while in school. Did they join clubs that provide a clue about their interests? Did they hold certain leadership positions that tell you what they’re committed to? What community service projects were they active in? This information can help you customize your communications more meaningfully. Involvement History: Monetary giving isn’t the only indicator of a donor’s interest in your organization. When you’re putting together your campaign lists, don’t forget to look at other historical indicators as well. Note: If you’re already using Network for Good’s simple, smart fundraising software, demographic details, like the ones above, need to be individually added as “Custom Fields” to a constituent’s record. Involvement in Advocacy Work: If an individual advocates for charities or causes, he or she is usually serious about making a difference and seeks to do so in other ways. Corporate Sponsorships: If someone has organized a corporate sponsorship for her or his place of employment, the individual has demonstrated a willingness to go the extra mile foryour organization. Showing Up at Events: If you have regulars who appear at your events, they’re prime candidates to get more involved. An events platform that integrates directly with your fundraising software can be a key tool here in making sure you’re following up with the right people. Network of Connections: Prospective donors will always be more willing to respond if a friend or business connection has introduced your organization to them. If you think an individual would be willing to contribute to your nonprofit, look at who in your donor database is connected to that person and ask for an introduction. This strategy can also be used for raising corporate sponsorships. Hobbies: Hobbies and interests will tell you who’s most likely to participate in your events. They’ll also give you ideas about what types of events will be most popular with your contacts. Here are a few ideas: Games: Trivia night, bingo, or board games. Outdoors: Run/Walk, golf or fishing tournament, or softball. Food & Drink: Wine tasting, celebrity chef or bartender, or profit share at a restaurant. Music: Benefit concert, talent show, or Battle of the Bands Arts & Culture: Group night at the theatre, charity poetry reading, or author meet-and-greet. Timing of Gifts: When do individuals give? If someone tends to make donations at a certain time of year, your request will probably be welcomed (and successful!) if you ask at that time. Using tools such as the “Giving” filters to conduct donor analysis can help determine if there are trends around a particular time of year for one (or multiple) donors – and knowing the timing of gifts will also help you spend your marketing dollars more wisely. If someone has given within a year-long time period, that person is much more likely to give again than someone who gave two years ago. You can allocate your marketing resources more intelligently if you know who is more likely to donate. These are just a few ideas on how to use your data to not only build a stronger donor experience but also increase your fundraising revenue. Learn why the donor experience is vital to a successful organization and how to implement an effective donor experience program by downloading “A Better Donor Experience: Is it the Cornerstone of Donor Loyalty?”

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NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

7 Reasons to Invest in a Volunteer Program

Article | May 20, 2022

Volunteers are the lifeblood of any nonprofit. Your services, fundraising campaigns, and even day-to-day operations of your nonprofit can depend on volunteers. An estimated 30 percent of Americans or 77.9 million people reported they volunteered for an organization or association.” AmeriCorps published survey So, if people want to volunteer, the key to garner willing volunteers is to: Communicate your needs Share your “why” Make it easy While all nonprofits know they need volunteers, investing time and energy into building a program can naturally fall by the wayside. As you look to recruit and retain volunteers, a best practice is to put a strategic volunteer program in place. You may be asking, “What’s the benefit to me, the nonprofit?” Let’s dive into it! First, let’s start with the basics — what are the top reasons to invest in a volunteer program? We’ve got you covered. A dynamic volunteer program: Creates ambassadors for your mission. Volunteers spread the word in your community and increase your community engagement. They can advocate for you with their friends, family, and local and state legislatures. Provide your volunteers with messaging so they can share their “why” on social media and by word of mouth. One pro tip shared by Points of Light is to provide a digital badge to add to your volunteer leaders’ email signatures. Develops new funding sources. The line between a volunteer and donor should be fluid, not separate. A 2014 study by Fidelity Charitable found that 83% of volunteers report supporting the same nonprofits with their donations. Don’t silo your volunteers and your donors! Reduces your operating costs. According to the Independent Sector, the value of a volunteer hour was estimated at $28.54 in 2020. Since payroll is often the largest expense for a nonprofit, volunteers provide essential support to your cause with minimal costs to you. Increases the quantity and quality of your programs and services. It’s a win-win situation for professional development and your lengthy project list! That list will be met by an eager, talented volunteer, and your volunteer will improve their professional skills at the same time. Maximizes your limited staff resources. We’re sure there’s been a few items on your wish list that you’d love to check off if you had more resources, like being open on holidays or offering more services to your community. Volunteers can fill in those gaps! Maybe they are looking for ways to give back over a holiday, or they may have the connections to develop a new service opportunity for you. Increases your diversity and brings in new ideas. Although your nonprofit may always strive to diversify or get out of the “we’ve always done it this way” rut, you may not meet the potential of those goals with your staff. Volunteers can provide unique perspectives, different experiences, and even that spark of excitement that comes with a new idea. Minimizes volunteer turnover.Just like staff onboarding, volunteer onboarding takes time and money. If you recruit and onboard well with easy-to-access opportunity matching, training, and tracking mechanisms in place, your volunteers will be well on their way to a successful experience. Build on that by learning more about your volunteers’ interests and skills, and they will feel seen and appreciated. An upfront investment will pay off in years of dedicated service. Are you convinced? If so, it’s time to take the next step of how to start putting a volunteer program into place. Then you can scale your volunteering as your nonprofit grows! Here are our 5 fundraiser-approved steps to developing a bullet-proof volunteer program. Step 1: Quantify your current volunteer impact. Gather data on number of volunteers, hours and skills contributed. Measure the return on investment (ROI) including your program cost and total estimated volunteer value (# of volunteer hours x est. volunteer wage per hour). You can even take it a step further and consider the monetary savings to the community when volunteers provide the service or in-kind donation versus a private provider (e.g. number of children tutored or trees planted). Step 2: Educate your staff and board on the benefits of volunteering. Share your ROI and other data with your executive team and board and garner to get them on board. Recruiting, onboarding, engaging, and retaining your volunteer base will be much smoother when you have their support. Step 3: Purchase or build a volunteer management software system. Track volunteer hours, record your volunteers’ information, and create reports. Your software/tracking system should include a personalized volunteer dashboard where they can track their hours and volunteer services provided, demonstrating to them their impact in real-time. Step 4: Develop a plan for recruitment, training, and growth opportunities for your volunteers. Share the plan with your current volunteer leaders and solicit their feedback before rolling out to the community. Step 5: Make the case for even more investment in your program next year. Give insight into how your efforts to recruit, engage, and retain volunteers positively impact your mission and your bottom line.

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American Academy of PAs

The American Academy of PAs (AAPA) is the only national professional association that represents all PAs across all medical settings and specialties in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories except for Puerto Rico, the armed forces and the federal services.

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NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

UCLA Law Launches Program on Philanthropy and Nonprofits

UCLA Law | September 22, 2021

With the philanthropy world on the precipice of revolutionary change due to the pending baby boomer wealth transfer, UCLA School of Law announced the formation of the Program on Philanthropy and Nonprofits, devoted to cutting-edge research, training and policy in this dynamic and evolving area of the law and society. It will reside within the law school's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy (LMI). The new program builds on the vision of LMI founder and UCLA Law alumnus Lowell Milken, who has utilized his own legal background to inform his work as both a businessman and a philanthropist. "We are immensely grateful to Lowell Milken for his visionary gift," said Jennifer Mnookin, Dean of the UCLA School of Law. "Our outstanding UCLA Law faculty, especially in tax law, nonprofit law and the governance of entities, positions us to be a national resource for scholarship and policy analysis of the nonprofit sector — and we can take a leadership role in the education of legal counsel, nonprofit directors and executives to meet the challenges that will shape nonprofits." As baby boomers pass on, they are expected to transfer tens of trillions of dollars in wealth to younger generations, well-established nonprofits and/or family foundations. This massive financial shift is set to upend the processes of philanthropy and the governance of nonprofits. The rise of new ways of conducting philanthropy and changes in the role of nonprofits places this issue closer to the heart of the national political, legal and social conversation. "We're undergoing a generational shift that promises to make some of the most significant changes to the universe of business law and policy in decades," said Milken. "There is a rare and important chance to make an impact on a national scale, and the talent and vision of the people at UCLA Law and LMI make this an exciting and irresistible opportunity." Among the nation's most eminent businessmen, philanthropists and leaders in education reform, Milken has donated more than $20 million to the law school during the past decade, including the $10 million gift, then the largest in the school's history, that launched LMI in 2011. A new gift of $3.7 million has made the new Program on Philanthropy and Nonprofits possible. Since its founding in 2011, LMI has been home to UCLA Law's business law and tax law programs, both ranked in the top 10 nationally. The new program will serve UCLA Law students and all stakeholders in the nonprofit sector, convening practitioners, donors, regulators and those who run nonprofits. Initially, the program will focus on three main goals: Become a research center that develops and shares scholarship and knowledge on issues relating to nonprofits with policymakers, regulators, lawyers and nonprofit senior managers. Develop and expand education at UCLA Law for students, lawyers, directors and nonprofit senior managers on issues central to nonprofit operations and governance. Support thought leadership on legal issues material to nonprofits, serving as an important resource for nonprofits and as a venue to bring together practitioners, scholars and regulators. "Lowell Milken brought this new law and philanthropy program concept to us, showing incredible foresight about generational wealth transfer," said Joel Feuer, executive director of LMI. "Thanks to his investment in this idea, we are now ready to launch a pioneering effort that again has the potential to transform a field of law." "The nonprofit sector is undergoing an epochal shift, and lawyers will be at the center of this transformation," said Professor Jill Horwitz, a renowned authority in the law of nonprofits and the program's inaugural faculty director. "UCLA Law and the Lowell Milken Institute now have the opportunity to lead the way in this especially relevant area." ABOUT UCLA SCHOOL OF LAW Founded in 1949, UCLA School of Law is one of the top-ranked law schools in the country. Its faculty are among the most influential scholars in business law, constitutional law, critical race studies, environmental law, evidence, immigration, public interest law, tax and other fields. UCLA Law's 18,000-plus alumni work in nearly every state and more than 50 countries as leaders in government, industry, social justice and the legal profession. Committed to the University of California's mission of teaching, research and service, the school offers students a strong foundation in the law as well as practical training through a robust experiential education program.

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PHILANTHROPY

Amylyx Pharmaceuticals Donates CENTAUR Clinical Trial Data and Participant Samples to Help Advance Science in ALS

Amylyx Pharmaceuticals | September 13, 2021

Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the donation of data from the CENTAUR clinical trial that evaluated the safety and efficacy of AMX0035 in participants with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database led by Alex Sherman at the Healey and AMG Center and Neurological Clinical Research Institute (NCRI) at Mass General Hospital. Amylyx also donated participants’ samples to the Northeast ALS Consortium (NEALS) Biorepository housed at Mass General Hospital and Barrow Neurological Institute. “It is going to take a consolidated community effort to beat ALS. Sharing data and biological samples with integral databases and biorepositories can play an important role in treatment and care breakthroughs if they are continuously updated,” said Joshua Cohen, Co-CEO, Chairman and Co-Founder of Amylyx. “Keeping data fresh will give the ALS community the information it needs to identify new pathways and approaches to developing new treatments. We’re grateful to each CENTAUR participant who donated invaluable time and energy to the clinical trial, and without whom this resource would not be possible,” added Justin Klee, Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Amylyx. The PRO-ACT database, which is currently sponsored by The ALS Association and managed by the NCRI, houses the largest ALS clinical trials dataset, containing nearly 11,000 ALS patient records from 23 completed clinical trials. The platform harmonizes and merges anonymized data from existing publicly and privately conducted ALS clinical trials to generate a unique, freely available resource for the scientific community to find cures for ALS. The PRO-ACT platform was selected as the Bio-IT World’s Best Practices Awards winner in 2013 and The Clinical Informatics News Best Practices winner in Clinical Data Intelligence category in 2015. The PRO-ACT platform was created by Prize4Life Israel, a non-profit organization, in partnership with NEALS and the NCRI at Mass General Hospital, and with initial funding from The ALS Therapy Alliance, Prize4Life, NCRI, and The ALS Association. To date, PRO-ACT has served as the primary data source for more than 70 publications and has been critical for numerous others. The platform has allowed researchers to better understand disease heterogeneity, develop novel predictive models of disease progression and has been a critical tool to support the design of several ALS clinical trials. “The PRO-ACT platform is only as valuable as the data that is fed into it,” said Avi Kremer, Founder of Prize4Life, an ALS Association consultant, and a person living with ALS. “Having data that take into account the evolving approaches to ALS treatment and results from trials allows the community to build on past work and move us closer to a cure for this devastating disease.” “Data that would otherwise normally sit with a company and not be accessible to researchers have become an invaluable resource, and most importantly, a freely shared one,” said Alex Sherman, Director of the Center for Innovation and Biomedical Informatics (CIB) at the Neurological Clinical Research Institute (NCRI) and Healey & AMG Center at Mass General, Principal Associate in Neurology at Harvard Medical School, leader of the team that created the PRO-ACT database, and the current Principal Investigator of the PRO-ACT platform. “Each learning brings us one step closer to better understanding, better diagnosing, and ultimately finding new or better treatments for ALS. We hope to see this momentum continue and more companies will follow Amylyx in data donations.” About Prize4Life Prize4Life is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to accelerate the discovery of treatments and a cure for ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) by using powerful incentives to attract new people and drive innovation. Prize4Life believes that solutions to some of the biggest challenges in ALS research will require out-of-the-box thinking, and that some of the most critical discoveries may come from unlikely places About the Northeast ALS Consortium The Northeast ALS Consortium (NEALS) is an international, independent, non-profit group of over 130 research sites around the world who collaboratively conduct clinical research in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and other motor neuron diseases. The mission of NEALS is to translate scientific advances into new treatments for people with ALS and motor neuron disease as rapidly as possible. The NEALS network is governed by an Executive Committee and the Consortium research activities are advised by an experienced Scientific Advisory Board. About Amylyx Pharmaceuticals Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a pharmaceutical company working on developing a novel therapeutic for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases

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PHILANTHROPY

Zing Health Aligns Corporate Mission and Philanthropy With Pledge 1%

Zing Health, Pledge 1% | September 07, 2021

Zing Health, a physician-founded-and-led provider of Medicare Advantage health plans, has made official its Pledge 1% program, raising its commitment to corporate philanthropy, community engagement, and STEM education. The healthcare startup pledges 1% of its profit, equity, and staff time to support local nonprofit initiatives, amplifying the social impact goals of Zing Health's founders and employees. "Our mission at Zing Health is to create a positive effect on our communities and ensure that everyone reaches optimal health," said Zing Health Founder and CEO Dr. Eric E. Whitaker. "Corporate philanthropy is an important component of that, and we encourage our employees to be a part of the solution." As part of this mission, Zing Health is a partner in Pledge 1%, which champions corporate donations and public engagement among early-stage companies. Pledge 1% aims to make a difference in the world by inspiring startups to give 1% of their product, profit, equity, or employee time to a charity of their choosing. Its founding partners include Salesforce, Atlassian, and Rally (now Broadcom), three successful tech companies that have shown how pledging a small portion of future success today can have an enormous impact tomorrow. "We are incredibly excited that Zing Health has taken the pledge," said Amy Lesnick, chief executive of Pledge 1%. "Zing Health can play a pivotal role in building this movement and promoting a new normal in which all companies—big and small—integrate giving back as a core value in their business." Forging Ahead with Philanthropy Zing Health has promised to donate 1% of future profits to local groups that address social determinants of health, including those who deal with community and workforce development or provide access to care, education, food, or housing. For example, Zing Health has teamed up with local food pantries, churches, and other not-for-profit groups to support and strengthen low-income families in the Chicago area through a collaboration with Acumen America. "Addressing the disparities related to social determinants of health is a big part of Zing Health's mission to ensure equal and accessible healthcare to all," said Dr. Whitaker, who was named by Modern Healthcare this year as one of the nation's top population health innovators. "Everyone deserves the same care, regardless of their race, background, or situation." As part of its pledge, Zing Health has seeded 1% of investor equity to the CPASS Foundation, a diversity STEM education initiative. CPASS partners with SMASH Academy, a college prep institute that provides students of color with viable pathways to healthcare careers. CPASS is also known for its Mini Medical School at Rush University and other programs to bring STEM education to underserved communities. Volunteer Ethos Fosters Community Engagement The company's workers have also pledged to spend at least 1% of their staff hours volunteering at local nonprofits. Zing Health lets them mark volunteer time off, and an internal leaderboard recognizes their initiative. As work patterns shift during the pandemic recovery, corporate events will incorporate offsite community engagement opportunities. The policy allows Rachel Sobel, Zing Health corporate communications director, to log volunteer hours for Recovery Dharma, a peer-led recovery support community. She has also served as an election judge without needing to use valuable PTO time. "I would be leading meetings during evenings or weekends anyhow, but Zing Health lets me accomplish things I can do only during work hours, such as maintaining our group's website, doing outreach to treatment centers, or serving as an election judge," Sobel said. Pledge 1% sharpens the Zing Health focus on volunteering and making a difference, continuing its mission to build better communities. Zing Health will align its strategy and work with the Pledge 1% community to make positive impacts and work towards ending disparities brought on by social determinants of health. "We believe that a commitment like this is one that everyone should be pledging," Dr. Whitaker said. "Ideals like this have been part of our DNA since the beginning, and we strive to create a better world for the communities we serve."

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NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

UCLA Law Launches Program on Philanthropy and Nonprofits

UCLA Law | September 22, 2021

With the philanthropy world on the precipice of revolutionary change due to the pending baby boomer wealth transfer, UCLA School of Law announced the formation of the Program on Philanthropy and Nonprofits, devoted to cutting-edge research, training and policy in this dynamic and evolving area of the law and society. It will reside within the law school's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy (LMI). The new program builds on the vision of LMI founder and UCLA Law alumnus Lowell Milken, who has utilized his own legal background to inform his work as both a businessman and a philanthropist. "We are immensely grateful to Lowell Milken for his visionary gift," said Jennifer Mnookin, Dean of the UCLA School of Law. "Our outstanding UCLA Law faculty, especially in tax law, nonprofit law and the governance of entities, positions us to be a national resource for scholarship and policy analysis of the nonprofit sector — and we can take a leadership role in the education of legal counsel, nonprofit directors and executives to meet the challenges that will shape nonprofits." As baby boomers pass on, they are expected to transfer tens of trillions of dollars in wealth to younger generations, well-established nonprofits and/or family foundations. This massive financial shift is set to upend the processes of philanthropy and the governance of nonprofits. The rise of new ways of conducting philanthropy and changes in the role of nonprofits places this issue closer to the heart of the national political, legal and social conversation. "We're undergoing a generational shift that promises to make some of the most significant changes to the universe of business law and policy in decades," said Milken. "There is a rare and important chance to make an impact on a national scale, and the talent and vision of the people at UCLA Law and LMI make this an exciting and irresistible opportunity." Among the nation's most eminent businessmen, philanthropists and leaders in education reform, Milken has donated more than $20 million to the law school during the past decade, including the $10 million gift, then the largest in the school's history, that launched LMI in 2011. A new gift of $3.7 million has made the new Program on Philanthropy and Nonprofits possible. Since its founding in 2011, LMI has been home to UCLA Law's business law and tax law programs, both ranked in the top 10 nationally. The new program will serve UCLA Law students and all stakeholders in the nonprofit sector, convening practitioners, donors, regulators and those who run nonprofits. Initially, the program will focus on three main goals: Become a research center that develops and shares scholarship and knowledge on issues relating to nonprofits with policymakers, regulators, lawyers and nonprofit senior managers. Develop and expand education at UCLA Law for students, lawyers, directors and nonprofit senior managers on issues central to nonprofit operations and governance. Support thought leadership on legal issues material to nonprofits, serving as an important resource for nonprofits and as a venue to bring together practitioners, scholars and regulators. "Lowell Milken brought this new law and philanthropy program concept to us, showing incredible foresight about generational wealth transfer," said Joel Feuer, executive director of LMI. "Thanks to his investment in this idea, we are now ready to launch a pioneering effort that again has the potential to transform a field of law." "The nonprofit sector is undergoing an epochal shift, and lawyers will be at the center of this transformation," said Professor Jill Horwitz, a renowned authority in the law of nonprofits and the program's inaugural faculty director. "UCLA Law and the Lowell Milken Institute now have the opportunity to lead the way in this especially relevant area." ABOUT UCLA SCHOOL OF LAW Founded in 1949, UCLA School of Law is one of the top-ranked law schools in the country. Its faculty are among the most influential scholars in business law, constitutional law, critical race studies, environmental law, evidence, immigration, public interest law, tax and other fields. UCLA Law's 18,000-plus alumni work in nearly every state and more than 50 countries as leaders in government, industry, social justice and the legal profession. Committed to the University of California's mission of teaching, research and service, the school offers students a strong foundation in the law as well as practical training through a robust experiential education program.

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PHILANTHROPY

Amylyx Pharmaceuticals Donates CENTAUR Clinical Trial Data and Participant Samples to Help Advance Science in ALS

Amylyx Pharmaceuticals | September 13, 2021

Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the donation of data from the CENTAUR clinical trial that evaluated the safety and efficacy of AMX0035 in participants with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database led by Alex Sherman at the Healey and AMG Center and Neurological Clinical Research Institute (NCRI) at Mass General Hospital. Amylyx also donated participants’ samples to the Northeast ALS Consortium (NEALS) Biorepository housed at Mass General Hospital and Barrow Neurological Institute. “It is going to take a consolidated community effort to beat ALS. Sharing data and biological samples with integral databases and biorepositories can play an important role in treatment and care breakthroughs if they are continuously updated,” said Joshua Cohen, Co-CEO, Chairman and Co-Founder of Amylyx. “Keeping data fresh will give the ALS community the information it needs to identify new pathways and approaches to developing new treatments. We’re grateful to each CENTAUR participant who donated invaluable time and energy to the clinical trial, and without whom this resource would not be possible,” added Justin Klee, Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Amylyx. The PRO-ACT database, which is currently sponsored by The ALS Association and managed by the NCRI, houses the largest ALS clinical trials dataset, containing nearly 11,000 ALS patient records from 23 completed clinical trials. The platform harmonizes and merges anonymized data from existing publicly and privately conducted ALS clinical trials to generate a unique, freely available resource for the scientific community to find cures for ALS. The PRO-ACT platform was selected as the Bio-IT World’s Best Practices Awards winner in 2013 and The Clinical Informatics News Best Practices winner in Clinical Data Intelligence category in 2015. The PRO-ACT platform was created by Prize4Life Israel, a non-profit organization, in partnership with NEALS and the NCRI at Mass General Hospital, and with initial funding from The ALS Therapy Alliance, Prize4Life, NCRI, and The ALS Association. To date, PRO-ACT has served as the primary data source for more than 70 publications and has been critical for numerous others. The platform has allowed researchers to better understand disease heterogeneity, develop novel predictive models of disease progression and has been a critical tool to support the design of several ALS clinical trials. “The PRO-ACT platform is only as valuable as the data that is fed into it,” said Avi Kremer, Founder of Prize4Life, an ALS Association consultant, and a person living with ALS. “Having data that take into account the evolving approaches to ALS treatment and results from trials allows the community to build on past work and move us closer to a cure for this devastating disease.” “Data that would otherwise normally sit with a company and not be accessible to researchers have become an invaluable resource, and most importantly, a freely shared one,” said Alex Sherman, Director of the Center for Innovation and Biomedical Informatics (CIB) at the Neurological Clinical Research Institute (NCRI) and Healey & AMG Center at Mass General, Principal Associate in Neurology at Harvard Medical School, leader of the team that created the PRO-ACT database, and the current Principal Investigator of the PRO-ACT platform. “Each learning brings us one step closer to better understanding, better diagnosing, and ultimately finding new or better treatments for ALS. We hope to see this momentum continue and more companies will follow Amylyx in data donations.” About Prize4Life Prize4Life is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to accelerate the discovery of treatments and a cure for ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) by using powerful incentives to attract new people and drive innovation. Prize4Life believes that solutions to some of the biggest challenges in ALS research will require out-of-the-box thinking, and that some of the most critical discoveries may come from unlikely places About the Northeast ALS Consortium The Northeast ALS Consortium (NEALS) is an international, independent, non-profit group of over 130 research sites around the world who collaboratively conduct clinical research in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and other motor neuron diseases. The mission of NEALS is to translate scientific advances into new treatments for people with ALS and motor neuron disease as rapidly as possible. The NEALS network is governed by an Executive Committee and the Consortium research activities are advised by an experienced Scientific Advisory Board. About Amylyx Pharmaceuticals Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a pharmaceutical company working on developing a novel therapeutic for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases

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PHILANTHROPY

Zing Health Aligns Corporate Mission and Philanthropy With Pledge 1%

Zing Health, Pledge 1% | September 07, 2021

Zing Health, a physician-founded-and-led provider of Medicare Advantage health plans, has made official its Pledge 1% program, raising its commitment to corporate philanthropy, community engagement, and STEM education. The healthcare startup pledges 1% of its profit, equity, and staff time to support local nonprofit initiatives, amplifying the social impact goals of Zing Health's founders and employees. "Our mission at Zing Health is to create a positive effect on our communities and ensure that everyone reaches optimal health," said Zing Health Founder and CEO Dr. Eric E. Whitaker. "Corporate philanthropy is an important component of that, and we encourage our employees to be a part of the solution." As part of this mission, Zing Health is a partner in Pledge 1%, which champions corporate donations and public engagement among early-stage companies. Pledge 1% aims to make a difference in the world by inspiring startups to give 1% of their product, profit, equity, or employee time to a charity of their choosing. Its founding partners include Salesforce, Atlassian, and Rally (now Broadcom), three successful tech companies that have shown how pledging a small portion of future success today can have an enormous impact tomorrow. "We are incredibly excited that Zing Health has taken the pledge," said Amy Lesnick, chief executive of Pledge 1%. "Zing Health can play a pivotal role in building this movement and promoting a new normal in which all companies—big and small—integrate giving back as a core value in their business." Forging Ahead with Philanthropy Zing Health has promised to donate 1% of future profits to local groups that address social determinants of health, including those who deal with community and workforce development or provide access to care, education, food, or housing. For example, Zing Health has teamed up with local food pantries, churches, and other not-for-profit groups to support and strengthen low-income families in the Chicago area through a collaboration with Acumen America. "Addressing the disparities related to social determinants of health is a big part of Zing Health's mission to ensure equal and accessible healthcare to all," said Dr. Whitaker, who was named by Modern Healthcare this year as one of the nation's top population health innovators. "Everyone deserves the same care, regardless of their race, background, or situation." As part of its pledge, Zing Health has seeded 1% of investor equity to the CPASS Foundation, a diversity STEM education initiative. CPASS partners with SMASH Academy, a college prep institute that provides students of color with viable pathways to healthcare careers. CPASS is also known for its Mini Medical School at Rush University and other programs to bring STEM education to underserved communities. Volunteer Ethos Fosters Community Engagement The company's workers have also pledged to spend at least 1% of their staff hours volunteering at local nonprofits. Zing Health lets them mark volunteer time off, and an internal leaderboard recognizes their initiative. As work patterns shift during the pandemic recovery, corporate events will incorporate offsite community engagement opportunities. The policy allows Rachel Sobel, Zing Health corporate communications director, to log volunteer hours for Recovery Dharma, a peer-led recovery support community. She has also served as an election judge without needing to use valuable PTO time. "I would be leading meetings during evenings or weekends anyhow, but Zing Health lets me accomplish things I can do only during work hours, such as maintaining our group's website, doing outreach to treatment centers, or serving as an election judge," Sobel said. Pledge 1% sharpens the Zing Health focus on volunteering and making a difference, continuing its mission to build better communities. Zing Health will align its strategy and work with the Pledge 1% community to make positive impacts and work towards ending disparities brought on by social determinants of health. "We believe that a commitment like this is one that everyone should be pledging," Dr. Whitaker said. "Ideals like this have been part of our DNA since the beginning, and we strive to create a better world for the communities we serve."

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